The agreement covers issues such as money, citizens` rights, border settlement and dispute settlement. It also contains a transition period and an overview of the future relationship between the UK and the EU. It was published on 14 November 2018 and was the result of the Brexit negotiations. The agreement was approved by the heads of state and government of the remaining 27 EU countries[9] and by the British government led by Prime Minister Theresa May, but it met with opposition from the British Parliament, whose approval was required for ratification. The consent of the European Parliament would also have been necessary. On 15 January 2019, the House of Commons rejected the Withdrawal Agreement by 432 votes to 202. [10] On March 12, 2019, the House of Commons again rejected the agreement by 391 votes to 242,[11] and rejected a third time on March 29, 2019 by 344 votes to 286. On 22 October 10, 2019, the revised withdrawal agreement negotiated by the Boris Johnson government opened the first stage in Parliament, but Johnson suspended the legislative process when the accelerated authorisation programme did not receive the necessary support and announced his intention to proclaim a general election. [12] On 23 January 2020, Parliament ratified the agreement by adopting the Withdrawal Agreement.

On 29 January 2020, the European Parliament approved the Withdrawal Agreement. It was then closed by the Council of the European Union on 30 January 2020. Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, said she „trusts the UK government to implement the Withdrawal Agreement, an obligation under international law and a precondition for any future partnership”. Former Justice Minister David Gauke said that because the UK had laws to repeal parts of the withdrawal treaty, each MP must decide whether to vote „for a strategy that involves or not the rejection of an international agreement reached last year”. After an unprecedented vote on 4 December 2018, MPs decided that the UK government was not respecting Parliament because it refused to give Parliament the full legal advice it had received on the impact of its proposed withdrawal conditions. [29] The central point of the opinion concerned the legal effect of the Backstop Agreement on Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom with regard to the customs border between the European Union and the United Kingdom and its impact on the Good Friday Agreement that led to the end of the unrest in Northern Ireland, and in particular on the security of the United Kingdom, to be able to leave the EU in practice, in accordance with the draft proposals. . . . .

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